STREETFILMS

Streetfilms produces short films showing how smart transportation design and policy can result in better places to live, work and play. 

 

Founded in 2006, Streetfilms became the go-to organization for educational films about sustainable transportation, and inspires action and behavioral change worldwide. Individuals, public agencies, non-profit organizations, schools, and transportation advocacy groups use Streetfilms to educate decision makers and make change for livable streets in their communities.

I produced over 100 films for Streetfilms between 2007 and 2013. All of the work that I made for Streetfilms can be viewed on Streetfilms.org.  Embedded on this page are my most viewed videos on Streetfilms.

1. From the Netherlands to America: Translating the World’s Best Bikeway Designs

13:49 | 2012

Streetfilms joined a group of city leaders from Chicago, Washington, DC and Miami on a study tour of the Netherlands, through the Bikes Belong Foundation's Bicycling Design Best Practices Program. The program shows American transportation professionals and policy makers real life examples of what it looks like to invest in cost-effective bicycle facilities. This video takes you on a tour of the incredibly well thought out street designs in the Netherlands. You'll see the infrastructure, hear from the experts on the ground, and watch the tour participants react and imagine how they might implement similar designs in American cities

2. The Biggest, Baddest Bike-Share in the World: Hangzhou, China

5:33 | 2012

Hangzhou's 2,050 bike-share stations are spaced less than a thousand feet from each other in the city center, and on an average day riders make 240,000 trips using the system. Its popularity and success have set a new standard for bike-sharing in Asia. And the city is far from finished. The Hangzhou Bicycle Company plans to expand the bike-share system to 175,000 bikes by 2020!

3. Copenhagen’s Climate-Friendly, Bike-Friendly Streets

5:09 | 2009

Tens of thousands of people from nearly every nation on earth have descended on Copenhagen this month for the UN climate summit. As the delegates try to piece together a framework for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they're also absorbing lessons from one of the world's leading cities in sustainable transportation. In Copenhagen, fully 37 percent of commute trips are made by bike, and mode share among city residents alone is even higher.